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Author: Mihirini de Zoysa

  /  Articles posted by Mihirini de Zoysa (Page 4)

"To want and to be ambitious and to want to be successful is not enough. That's just desire. To know what you want, to understand why you're doing it, to dedicate every breath in your body, to achieve . . . If you feel that you have something to give, if you feel that your particular talent is worth developing, is worth caring for, then there's nothing you can't achieve." Kevin Spacey Watch this short video of Kevin Spacey on Being Successful

A decline in pollinating insects in India is resulting in reduced vegetable yields and could limit people's access to a nutritional diet, a study warns. Indian researchers said there was a "clear indication" that pollinator abundance was linked to productivity.They added that the loss of the natural service could have a long-term impact on the farming sector, which accounts for almost a fifth of the nation's GDP.Globally, pollination is estimated to be worth £141bn $224bn each year. via Link: BBC News - 'Pollination crisis' hitting India's vegetable farmers.

Link: YouTube - How To Be Alone. A beautiful poem about being alone. In a social order that does everything in its power to stop you from being alone with its commercial and manufactured entertainment, we forget that it is ok to be alone. That it is important to learn to be alone. Alone is a way of being, a practiced art. Learn it. Embrace it. Be at peace with it.

What you think you know about fostering creativity is wrong. A look at what really works. Brainstorming in a group became popular in 1953 with the publication of a business book, Applied Imagination. But it’s been proven not to work since 1958, when Yale researchers found that the technique actually reduced a team’s creative output: the same number of people generate more and better ideas separately than together. In fact, according to University of Oklahoma professor Michael Mumford, half of the commonly used techniques intended to spur creativity don’t work, or

The necessity of human ingenuity is undisputed. A recent IBM poll of 1,500 CEOs identified creativity as the No. 1 “leadership competency” of the future. Yet it’s not just about sustaining our nation’s economic growth. All around us are matters of national and international importance that are crying out for creative solutions, from saving the Gulf of Mexico to bringing peace to Afghanistan to delivering health care. Such solutions emerge from a healthy marketplace of ideas, sustained by a populace constantly contributing original ideas and receptive to the ideas of

Sometimes it can be frustrating to watch the progress of your own dreams. One of the funniest quotes I came across recently on twitter is "I'm sick of following my dreams I'm just going to ask them where they're going and hook up with them later... " by @MrTommyLand. I thought that summed up the frustration of following your dreams. And good advice in dealing with the frustration. What frustrates me personally about following my dreams? There are many, but today these were the ones I came up with.

A 10-year experiment that started with Indian slum children being given access to computers has produced a new concept for education. Professor Sugata Mitra has watched the children teach themselves - and others - how to use the machines and gather information. Follow up experiments suggest children around the world can learn complex tasks quickly with little supervision. via Link: BBC News - Using computers to teach children with no teachers.

Jonah Lehrer makes an intriguing argument that in high pressure situations, rather than exerting every last ounce of energy on concentrating, people should take breaks and focus on something else. This is one of several arguments I've seen in the last week or so suggesting that some aspect of how we structure our work lives--from creating high stakes incentives to managing multiple streams of information at once--is fundamentally at odds with how our brains actually work. Which is to say, we've designed our work lives based on theories about human

There's no denying the wave of horror that washes over you at the moment you finally connect the dots and realize that there's a crisis looming — and no one is listening. Case in point: the plight of the humble honeybee. It's no secret that colony collapse disorder, viruses and even exceptionally hard winters are clipping the wings of hives worldwide. Nobody's quite sure what's behind such a catastrophic decline; a new USDA bee survey hopes to uncover the cause. "It's all very well to be worried about the fuzzy little

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